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Government & Nonprofit

The information below provides an overview of the government and public policy industries and job functions, and can be used as a step-by-step guide for starting a career in government and public policy.

Government

What is Government & Public Policy?
Government is one of the most important areas of our society with matters of defense, crime prevention, the administration of justice, the conservation of the environment, education, fair labor practices, family law, the registry of property transfers, the purity of food and drugs, agricultural prices, the soundness of the currency, flood control, responsible banking practices, immigration, zoning, taxation, foreign trade policies, and many more concerns of daily life. When beginning your job or internship search it is important to start to distinguish where your interests are so that you can better target your job or internship search. Pursuing work for a Federal or Local Government organization indicates that you want to be part of an agency that is responsible for the oversight and administration of specific functions, such as an intelligence agency. Day to day activities are affected by the issues of the day: current needs concerning public safety, terrorism, environmental protection, internet security, and cultural diversity are becoming more urgent. There is a notable variety of agency types. However, pursing internships or jobs in Public Policy can mean working on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., in local politics, for a particular political party, for a lobbying organization, a politically-affiliated nonprofit, or a think tank. (Vault, 2015)

Skill Set
You will need a bachelor degree and critical thinking skills to succeed in government roles. All majors are accepted, however focusing on American Studies, International Business, History, International Studies, Political Science, or Philosophy Politics Economics and Law (PPEL) can provide a strong basis for a career in government and public policy.

Internships
Gaining intern and/or volunteer experience in government related organizations and political campaigns will help you build the skills and qualifications needed in the industry. Deadlines for summer internships are in the fall and early spring. Take advantage of opportunities to volunteer with organizations related to your governmental area of interest.

Entry Level Full-Time Opportunities
Entry level positions can vary. Consider positions with city, state, and federal offices including Foreign Services, U.S. Congress, state legislatures, lobbyists, think tanks, and political science departments of colleges and universities. Positions can include campaign staff, and government office staff. Be sure to become familiar with the usajobs.gov website, the online database for all government jobs. Most government positions require extensive background checks, so prepare for a long application and hiring process.

Salary Expectations
Your salary may vary depending on the sector, the organization, the geographic region, and your skills and experience level. Click here to view the National Association of Colleges and Employers salary resources. There is not much room for salary negotiation at the entry-point of any career path, and most organizations have benchmarked salaries with their competitors.

Hiring Process
For Federal positions, start with the Frequently Asked Questions Page by the Partnership for Public Service. The Partnership for Public Service is a non-profit organization with the best and most up-to-date information about applying to positions with the federal government. READ it in detail before attempting to apply to positions on The Federal Government’s Official Jobs Site.

Government positions often require applications and resumes—especially if there is a criminal background check involved. Applications often require the following information: list of past jobs (no matter how short a time you held it), supervisor names, phone numbers, dates of employment, beginning and ending salary, past residences, and all school information including high school. RESUMES FOR FEDERAL POSITIONS CAN BE MORE THAN ONE PAGE. Read the job announcement carefully, highlighting key words or phrases describing the position responsibilities so you remember to address those points in your resume or in answer to application questions.

Start applying 6-8 months before you want to work. Within two months of applying you should know whether you will be interviewed for the position, then if they are interested in you and the position requires a background check that can take 4-6 months or more. An agency will not do a background check for employment unless you are a serious candidate.
Government Job Dos and Dont's

  • A clean record—no felony convictions, no DUIs
  • No illegal drugs or abuse of prescription or over the counter drugs
  • Good credit history is a good idea—no defaults of student loan (insured by the U.S. Government)
  • A urinalysis drug test must be passed
  • Register with the Selective Service System (Males over 18 http://www.sss.gov/regist.htm)
  • Criminal background checks for high security positions are performed once you are selected as a candidate for an interview—applicants must provide work history from 18 on up—DO NOT LEAVE ANY JOB OUT, even if you only had it for an hour.
  • Lying will keep you from being hired, you will take a polygraph and may continue for the rest of your career in a security clearance profession.
  • No illegal downloading of music For local government positions go to their respective webpages and read in detail how to apply to positions.

For local government positions go to their respective webpages and read in detail how to apply to positions.

Campus Resources for a Career in Government & Public Policy

*Some resources have eligibility requirements.  Review program websites or contact the program directly for details.

Freshman

Sophomore

Junior

Senior

Explore

Amnesty International

X

X

X

X

College Republicans

X

X

X

X

Mock Trial

X

X

X

X

Model United Nations Society

X

X

X

X

Phi Alpha Delta

X

X

X

X

Pi Sigma Alpha

X

X

X

X

Roosevelt Institute

X

X

X

X

Student Government Associations

X

X

X

X

UR Debate Council

X

X

X

X

UR ONE

X

X

X

X

UR Young Democrats

X

X

X

X

Young Americans for Liberty

X

X

X

X

Alumni Informational Interviews

X

X

X

Wellness 090: Career Exploration

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepare

Resume Review Workshop

X

X

 

 

Mock Interview/Interview Workshop

X

X

X

 

Internship/Externship

X

X

Evening of Etiquette

 

X

X

X

Company/Organization Information Sessions

X

X

X

Wellness 090: Life & Career After UR

 

 

X

X

Connect

On-Campus Interviews

X

X

X

Spiders for the Common Good

X

X

X

X

Government & Nonprofit Expo

X

X

X

X

UR Career Expos

X

X

X

X

Campus Resources for a Career in Government & Public Policy-Defined

Alumni Informational Interviews
Most UR alumni are willing to talk with you and share insights about their industry and career path via informational interviews.  After meeting alumni at career and networking events, you can reach out to them directly to schedule a 30 minute informational interview. You can also meet alumni via the Alumni Informational Interview Program.  The program is designed to invite a group of University of Richmond alumni to share the Richmond experience with applicants in target cities throughout the country.

Amnesty International
Amnesty International is the world's largest grassroots organization. Our purpose is to protect people wherever justice, freedom, truth and dignity are denied. We investigate and expose abuses, educate and mobilize the public, and help transform societies to create a safer world. Our vision is of a world in which every person - regardless of race, religion, gender, or ethnicity - enjoys all human rights.

College Republicans
The URCRs is a club for conservative undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Richmond.

Company/Organization Information Sessions
Many of UR’s partner organizations provide Company Information Sessions on campus.  In these sessions, company representatives will provide an overview of their organization and describe internships and jobs for students and recent graduates.  These sessions are a great way for you to learn about a company, job function, and industry and allow you the opportunity to ask questions and network with professionals. 

Government & Nonprofit Expo
The Office of Alumni and Career Services invites students and employers to register for the upcoming Government & Nonprofit Networking Reception and Expo in Washington, D.C. Students will have the opportunity to network with alumni living in Washington, D.C., who work in the Government and Nonprofit sectors. 

Internship/Externship
Internships are opportunities for you to gain hands-on experience in an occupation or profession of interest to you.  Internships are usually 8-10 week experiences during the summer of your junior year, and can be paid or unpaid.  Externships are often shorter term experiences during the summer of your sophomore year where you may be learning about an organization or industry. Both experiences are a good way for you to try out different industries and job functions.

Mock Interview/Interview Workshops
Prepare for the interview process by attending a Career Services sponsored interviewing workshop, where you will hear about the interview process and learn tactics for excelling in a behavioral interview. Schedule a one-on-one mock interview with a career advisor to practice your interview skills. 

Mock Trial
Mock Trial is a competitive program where teams prepare and argue court cases against teams from other colleges across the nation. Mock Trial is a program which tends to attract those on the Pre-Law track, but also gains members from every academic department. We prepare entire legal cases for competitions, including witness examinations, objections, speeches, characters roles, and the like. Then, from August to April, we spend the year competing at tournaments all over the country.

Model United Nations (UN) Society: Model United Nations is an academic student organization which focuses on educating members about current events on a global scale, topics and controversies relating to international relations, and the value of diplomacy by simulating the United Nations assembly and agenda.

On-Campus Interviews (Recruiting)
Many of UR’s partner organizations conduct interviews for externships, internships, and full-time jobs on campus via Career Services. These opportunities are posted by the employers on SpiderConnect, where you will apply for the job, and if selected, schedule an interview. 

Phi Alpha Delta
Phi Alpha Delta's Pre-Law Fraternity is an academic fraternity for students who share a common interest in the law and political science. All majors are welcome to apply.

Pi Sigma Alpha 
The purpose of the organization is to recognize excellence in academic achievement by undergraduate and graduate students in the fields of political science, government, international and public affairs; to stimulate scholarship and interest in political science; to promote worthwhile curricular and extracurricular activities related to political science; to promote civil dialog; and to engage in any other activities that further these purposes. Additionally the goal of this organization is to unite political science students in an effort to provide them with the opportunity to discuss common concerns, exchange ideas and information both on the formal and informal level.

Resume Review Workshops
UR Career Services holds workshops where you can learn about the basics of resume writing and get your resumes reviewed by peer advisors and career advisers.

Roosevelt Institute
The Roosevelt Institute seeks to generate bold progressive ideas, develop the next generation of progressive leadership, and promote the Roosevelt legacy. The Institute's Four Freedoms Center is designed to promote a rigorous debate about progressive policies and values and to deploy their strongest proponents in the public sphere.

Spiders for the Common Good
This trip allowed students to travel to Washington, D.C. and Richmond, Va. to explore the nonprofit and government industries and get the latest info on career opportunities from professionals in the field. 

Student Government Associations
WCGA- The Westhampton College Government Association serves the University of Richmond by representing student opinions, developing university-wide programming, maintaining traditions and providing students with an opportunity to be leaders.

RCSGA- The RCSGA is the overarching body of student governance for Richmond College. The association includes the Richmond College Senate, Honor Council, and Judicial Council and works with the Richmond College class cabinets. The members of this group are charged with representing their fellow students' concerns and opinions and serving as liaisons between students and administration, faculty, and staff.

Student Government Association (SGA) is made up of members of the School of Professional & Continuing Studies student body, supervised by an administrative board that meets regularly. The mission of SGA is to promote and organize events and activities throughout the academic year designed to engage SPCS students with each other as well as with the campus community.

UR Career Expo
The Spider Career Expos allow students and alumni to connect with full-time and internship opportunities. Approximately 50 organizations and more than 300 students attend annually. The expos are open to students in all majors and class years.

UR Debate Council
The UR Debate Council promotes critical assessment of current and past global issues through Parliamentary Debate Tournaments and outreach within the University Community.

UR ONE
UR ONE is dedicated to raising awareness of issues such as global poverty and preventable disease. Through meetings, documentary screenings, and letter signing campaigns we work together to teach hands-on the UR community about these crises, and to impact policy decisions regarding those less fortunate.

UR Young Democrats
We, the members of UR Young Democrats, in order to further the ideals and principles of the Democratic Party, work to improve our society through peaceful reform and effective government, and serve those in need in our community.

Wellness 090: Career Exploration
Students who complete Career Exploration will:  Learn about and practice using Career Services resources, in person and online; Develop self-awareness through use of personality and values assessment tools; Gain the skills necessary to create well-written resumes and cover letters; Learn the basics of using LinkedIn; Complete an informational interview with a professional working in an industry of interest; Develop strategies for considering and selecting a major(s).

Wellness 090: Life & Career After UR
Students who complete Life and Careers will: Learn about and practice using Career Services tools and resources, in person and online; Increase self-awareness through occupational and values assessment exercises; Obtain the skills necessary to create tailored, well-written resumes and cover letters; Learn strategies for maximizing use of LinkedIn to manage a professional network; Complete an out-of-class career development exercise relevant to career goals and needs.

Young Americans for Liberty
Young Americans for Liberty promotes freedom through activism events, speakers, and more. YAL connects small-government activists with like-minded students at UR, and with hundreds of thousands of members across the country.

Online Career Resources

Federal Government
The Partnership for Public Service
The Federal Government’s Official Jobs Site 

Local
State and Local Government on the Net
Council of State Governments
National Association of Counties
International City/County Management Association
National League of Cities 

Policy
U.S. House of Representatives
U.S. Senate
National Conference of State Legislatures
The Home Page of Capitol Hill Professionals, Staffers, Interns, and Washington DC positions
A Political and Public Affairs Staffing Agency
Washington Networking Group
General Listing of DC positions
Think Tanks

Nonprofit

What is Non-Profit?

Careers in the nonprofit sector offer an opportunity to combine your work with your passions and to help improve society while you fulfill your professional goals. Nonprofit groups function on local, national, and global levels to address all sorts of issues, from health care and politics to social and religious issues. Many are set up like corporations with executive directors and chief financial officers, but the common denominator among them is that their bottom line is based on public service and not on profit. (Vault) 

Skill Set

You will need a passion for the organization’s cause along with skills that allow you to contribute to the success of the organization. This can include organizational skills, business knowledge, client relations experience, and strong written and oral communications experience. For many business roles within the non-profit field like accounting or finance, you will need functional specific education and/or experience.

Internships

Non-profit positions are as varied as the organizations that bring their services to the public. There are structured internship programs that exist at non-profit organizations for a variety of business functions (education, development, and marketing) with deadlines that may begin as early as mid-fall semester extending through late spring.

The best way to get your foot in the door and gain experience is to start as a volunteer. While this may not be labeled as an “internship,” this experiential opportunity is great hands on experience that will also give you knowledge on how a nonprofit organization operates. The Center for Civic Engagement can help you connect with opportunities to engage in the Richmond community. Nonprofits do offer internship programs for students, and there are many that may not have a formal program but are open to hosting a student intern if you’re able to contact them and create your own opportunity.

Entry Level Full-time Opportunities

Entry level positions in non-profit organizations include:

Community engagement

Program assistant

Accountant

Database coordinator

Research & policy analyst

Human resource assistant

Fundraising & grant writing

Volunteer coordinator

Technology coordinator

There are also many positions available in business departments like marketing, accounting, and human resources. 

Salary Expectations

Your salary may vary depending on the sector, the organization, the geographic region, and your role, skills, and experience level. Click here to view the National Association of Colleges and Employers salary resources. There is not much room for salary negotiation at the entry-point of any career path, and most organizations have benchmarked salaries with their competitors.  

Recruiting Timeline

Many organizations and departments typically do not have structured full-time recruiting programs, and positions become open as needed. In many situations you should apply directly via the organization's web site.

Networking is important in this field, so building your network and volunteering while looking for jobs in the non-profit field should begin as early as your freshman year and continue into senior year and the summer after you graduate.

Interviewing Process

The interviewing process typically begins with a behavioral screening interview. Additional interviews may be more function-specific, delving into your area of expertise. If you are interviewing for a business-related position, you may be asked questions specific to your area of business expertise. It is important that you prepare for all interviews.  UR Career Services can provide you with preparation tools and mock interviews to help you put your best foot forward in the interview process.

Campus Resources for a Career in the Non-Profit Industry

*Some resources have eligibility requirements.  Review program websites or contact the program directly for details.

Freshman

Sophomore

Junior

Senior

Explore

Center for Civic Engagement

X

X

X

X

Bonner Scholars

X

X

X

X

HandsOn Greater Richmond

X

X

X

X

Alumni Informational Interviews

X

X

X

X

Wellness 090: Career Exploration

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepare

Resume Review Workshop

X

X

X

X

Mock Interview/Interview Workshop

X

X

X

X

Evening of Etiquette

X

X

X

Internship/Externship

X

X

X

Company Information Sessions

X

X

X

X

Wellness 090: Life & Career After UR

 

X

X

Connect

Spiders for the Common Good Road Trip

X

X

X

X

On-Campus Interviews

X

X

X

Government & Nonprofit Expo

X

X

X

X

UR Career Expos

X

X

X

X

Campus Resources for a Career in Nonprofit-Defined

Alumni Informational Interviews
Most UR alumni are willing to talk with you and share insights about their industry and career path via informational interviews.  After meeting alumni at career and networking events, you can reach out to them directly to schedule a 30 minute informational interview. You can also meet alumni via the Alumni Informational Interview Program.  The program is designed to invite a group of University of Richmond alumni to share the Richmond experience with applicants in target cities throughout the country.

Bonner Scholars
The BSP is a four-year commitment to sustained community engagement and social justice education. Typically, 25 students per class year are selected to be Bonner Scholars. Bonner Scholars are individually matched with local nonprofit organizations in the second semester of their first year, after they have had an opportunity to identify social issues they want to further explore. Some examples include youth development, public health, refugee and immigration services, and community development. Bonner Scholars commit to ten hours per week of community engagement. To complement direct service at community partner organizations, scholars attend training and educational opportunities on and off campus including lectures, workshops, and forums. In addition, all scholars take a course through the Jepson School of Leadership Studies, "Justice and Civil Society," during the second semester of their first year. The course explores the meaning and practice of justice in contemporary society.

Center for Civic Engagement
Forge long-lasting partnerships in which local organizations teach and learn alongside students and faculty, and benefit from shared resources and ideas. We connect our local partners with students and faculty in a variety of ways, from comprehensive neighborhood-based civic-engagement programs to issue-based initiatives, to even one-time volunteer opportunities for campus organizations looking to give back. And, we often call on community experts in their fields to join us for discussion and action around pressing social issues.

Company Information Sessions
Many of UR’s partner organizations provide Company Information Sessions on campus.  In these sessions, company representatives will provide an overview of their organization and describe internships and jobs for students and recent graduates.  These sessions are a great way for you to learn about a company, job function, and industry and allow you the opportunity to ask questions and network with professionals. 

Evening of Etiquette
Network with UR alumni to learn how to make a good impression during a business meal. Practice your networking skills as you learn to engage someone in conversation, and yes, even use the correct fork. 

HandsOn Greater Richmond
HandsOn Greater Richmond provides a link for individuals, families, teams, and corporate groups to join together and engage in meaningful volunteer opportunities within the Greater Richmond region. They offer unique, fun, and flexible ways for you to get connected and involved. www.handsonrva.org

Government & Nonprofit Expo
The Office of Alumni and Career Services invites students and to attend the Government & Nonprofit Networking Reception and Expo in Washington, D.C. Students will have the opportunity to network with alumni living in Washington, D.C., who work in the Government and Nonprofit sectors. 

Internship/Externship
Internships are opportunities for you to gain hands-on experience in an occupation or profession of interest to you.  Internships are usually 8-10 week experiences during the summer of your junior year, and can be paid or unpaid.  Externships are often shorter term experiences during the summer of your sophomore year where you may be learning about an organization or industry.  Both experiences are a good way for you to try out different industries and job functions.

Mock Interview/Interview Workshops
Prepare for the interview process by attending a Career Services sponsored interviewing workshop, where you will hear about the interview process and learn tactics for excelling in a behavioral interview.  Schedule a one-on-one mock interview with a career advisor to practice your interview skills. 

On-Campus Interviews (Recruiting)
Many of UR’s partner organizations conduct interviews for externships, internships, and full-time jobs on campus via Career Services. These opportunities are posted by the employers on SpiderConnect, where you will apply for the job, and if selected, schedule an interview. 

Resume Review Workshops 
UR Career Services holds workshops where you can learn about the basics of resume writing and get your resumes reviewed by peer advisors and career advisers.

UR Career Expo
The Spider Career Expos allow students and alumni to connect with full-time and internship opportunities. Approximately 50 organizations and more than 300 students attend annually. The expos are open to students in all majors and class years.

Wellness 090 Career Exploration
Students who complete Career Exploration will:  Learn about and practice using Career Services resources, in person and online; Develop self-awareness through use of personality and values assessment tools; Gain the skills necessary to create well-written resumes and cover letters; Learn the basics of using LinkedIn; Complete an informational interview with a professional working in an industry of interest; Develop strategies for considering and selecting a major(s).

Wellness 090 Life & Career After UR
Students who complete Life and Careers will: Learn about and practice using Career Services tools and resources, in person and online; Increase self-awareness through occupational and values assessment exercises; Obtain the skills necessary to create tailored, well-written resumes and cover letters; Learn strategies for maximizing use of LinkedIn to manage a professional network; Complete an out-of-class career development exercise relevant to career goals and needs.

Online Career Resources

Careers For Good

Commongood Careers

ConnectVA

GuideStar

Idealist.Org

NonProfitJobs.org 

Nonprofit Leadership Alliance

Nonprofit Oyster

PublicServiceCareers.org

The Chronicle of Philanthropy

The NonProfit Times

Education

What is Education?

Nearly one in four Americans is enrolled as a student at any given time. This enormous segment of the U.S. population encompasses people of all ages and from all walks of life. Students have a wide range of educational goals—from learning their ABCs to obtaining an MD—but each of these students needs the support of dedicated educators in order to obtain the knowledge and skills they need. Education is America’s second largest industry, and the different career tracks within education are extremely varied.

Within K-12 education, in addition to classroom teaching there are roles in the school system as School Counselors, Special Education Teachers, and administrators. Outside of the public school system there is a vast network of private and independent K-12 schools that may also have roles in fundraising/development, admissions, and alumni programming.

Higher education is another large part of the education sector. A job in just about any function can be found at a higher education institution from student facing roles as faculty or student services providers, to behind the scenes roles in finance, marketing, and human resources.

Skill Set

While there is no education major at UR, if you are interested in classroom teaching you should minor in Teaching Education and participate in a student teaching experience. Depending on whether you are interested in primary or secondary education will help determine your major. You will need a bachelor degree. Teacher Licensure is required in order to teach in public schools and some independent/private schools. If you are interested in higher education, you should consider a graduate degree in higher education.

Experiential Learning

There are many ways you can engage in experiential learning to prepare you for a position in the education industry.  Student teaching provides hands-on, in-class experience. You can also gain experience by working as a counselor at a summer camp, volunteering as a tutor, or exploring intern opportunities at museums, and other education based organizations. During the school year UR’s Academic Skills Center provides opportunities for you to engage in one-on-one tutoring by joining the Peer Academic Skills Tutoring Team. 

Entry Level Full-time Opportunities

Entry-level teaching opportunities are available as K-12 educators in public, private, and charter schools. There is currently a great need for teachers in the STEM fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. Programs like Teach for America, City Year, World Teach, and AmeriCorps are also good opportunities to gain education experience after graduation.  

If you are interested in exploring higher education opportunities, entry-level roles in higher education are available in student affairs, development, and admissions departments. Most roles involving student advising require a master degree.  

Salary Expectations

Teaching salaries vary depending on teaching discipline, geographic region, and the skill of the candidate. Click here to view the National Association of Colleges and Employers salary resources. There is not much room for salary negotiation at the entry-point of any career path, and most organizations have benchmarked salaries with their competitors.

Recruiting Timeline

Job fairs for K-12 teachers, administrators and other support staff typically take place each year beginning in late January and running through March/April. Teacher job fairs are held by geographic region, so it is important to identify regions of interest to you, and watch for scheduled career fairs. 

Organizations like Teach for America recruit candidates each spring, with some organizations coming to UR for on-campus interviews at Career Services. Watch SpiderConnect for job postings and interview schedules. 

If you are interested in careers in higher education, jobs on college campuses are filled year-round with the bulk of positions opening and being filled from late winter through late summer/early fall. 

Interviewing Process

Teaching interviews focus on your teaching beliefs and philosophy as well as your background. The interview will often start with a request to “Tell me about yourself." After that, most questions are behavioral based, asking for examples of your experiences.

You will need to bring your teaching portfolio, containing several copies of your resume, a copy of your teaching certificate, sample lesson plans, samples of student work, and other evidence of your teaching experience. 

The interview process for organizations like Teach for America (TFA) focuses on your teaching skills, and on your resilience and ability to handle difficult student situations. Questions like: “Tell me about the most difficult teaching experience you have ever faced” and “Why would you quit TFA” are common. 

Campus Resources for a Career in Education

*Some resources have eligibility requirements. Review program websites or contact the program directly for details.

Freshman

Sophomore

Junior

Senior

Explore

Work at a Summer Camp

X

X

X

X

 

Center for Civic Engagement

X

X

X

X

 

HandsOn Greater Richmond

X

X

X

X

 

Alumni Informational Interviews

 

X

X

X

 

Wellness 090: Career Exploration

X

X

 

 

 Prepare

Resume Review Workshop

X

X

X

X

Mock Interview & Interview Workshops

X

X

X

X

 

Peer Academic Skills Tutoring Team

 

X

X

X

 

Evening of Etiquette

 

X

X

X

 

Internship/Volunteer

X

X

 

Wellness 090: Life & Career after UR

X

X

 

Connect

Job Fairs for K-12 Teachers

X

 

On-Campus Interviews (Recruiting)

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

Campus Resources for a Career in Education-Defined

Alumni Informational Interviews
Most UR alumni are willing to talk with you and share insights about their industry and career path via informational interviews. After meeting alumni at career and networking events, you can reach out to them directly to schedule a 30 minute informational interview. You can also meet alumni via the Alumni Informational Interview Program. The program is designed to invite a group of University of Richmond alumni to share the Richmond experience with applicants in target cities throughout the country.

Center for Civic Engagement
Forge long-lasting partnerships in which local organizations teach and learn alongside students and faculty, and benefit from shared resources and ideas. We connect our local partners with students and faculty in a variety of ways, from comprehensive neighborhood-based civic-engagement programs to issue-based initiatives, to even one-time volunteer opportunities for campus organizations looking to give back. And, we often call on community experts in their fields to join us for discussion and action around pressing social issues.

HandsOn Greater Richmond
HandsOn Greater Richmond provides a link for individuals, families, teams, and corporate groups to join together and engage in meaningful volunteer opportunities within the Greater Richmond region. They offer unique, fun, and flexible ways for you to get connected and involved. www.handsonrva.org

Internship/Volunteer
Internships are opportunities for you to gain hands-on experience in an occupation or profession of interest to you. Internships are usually 8-10 week experiences during the summer of your junior year, and can be paid or unpaid. Volunteer opportunities related to education give you the opportunity to gain experience and try different roles. Both experiences are a good way for you to try out different industries and job functions.

Mock Interview/Interview Workshops
Prepare for the interview process by attending a Career Services sponsored interviewing workshop, where you will hear about the interview process and learn tactics for excelling in a behavioral interview. Schedule a one-on-one mock interview with a career advisor to practice your interview skills. 

On-Campus Interviews (Recruiting)
Many of UR’s partner organizations conduct interviews for externships, internships, and full-time jobs on campus via Career Services. These opportunities are posted by the employers on SpiderConnect, where you will apply for the job, and if selected, schedule an interview.

Peer Academic Skills Tutoring Team
Opportunities are available to tutor UR students one-on-one in many subjects. As a tutor, you will assist students seeking help in developing course-specific study skills and techniques. Contact the Academic Skills Center to make a difference in the lives of UR students. 

Resume Review Workshops
UR Career Services holds workshops where you can learn about the basics of resume writing and get your resumes reviewed by peer advisors and career advisers.

Wellness 090 Career Exploration
Students who complete Career Exploration will: Learn about and practice using Career Services resources, in person and online; Develop self-awareness through use of personality and values assessment tools; Gain the skills necessary to create well-written resumes and cover letters; Learn the basics of using LinkedIn; Complete an informational interview with a professional working in an industry of interest; Develop strategies for considering and selecting a major(s).

Wellness 090 Life & Career After UR
Students who complete Life and Careers will: Learn about and practice using Career Services tools and resources, in person and online; Increase self-awareness through occupational and values assessment exercises; Obtain the skills necessary to create tailored, well-written resumes and cover letters; Learn strategies for maximizing use of LinkedIn to manage a professional network; Complete an out-of-class career development exercise relevant to career goals and needs.

Work at Summer Camp
Working as a counselor at a summer camp allows you to gain skills working with children in different age groups, and with differing skill levels. You will have the opportunity to develop leadership skills while gaining valuable experience.

Online Career Resources

American Federation of Teachers

Association for Experiential Education

American Association for Employment in Education

Bureau of Labor Statistics-Occupational Outlook Handbook

Chronicle of Higher Education

College Student Educators International (ACPA)

HigherEdJobs.com

National Association for the Education of Young Children

National Education Association

NGS Movement: The Next Generation of Service

Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education (NAPSA)

Southern Teachers Agency

Teach for America

Teach Virginia

Virginia Tech Career Services Comprehensive Virginia and Southeastern Education Job Fairs Calendar

 

Meet your advisor!

chancy
Beth Chancy
Government

Meet your advisor!

halligan
Brendan Halligan
Nonprofit, Education

Government & Nonprofit Events

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